What I Read in January

Don’t look now, but this blog might slowly… sleepily… on wobbly legs… be emerging from its slumber. Might. I might also just be laid up in bed, feeling grumpy about my achey face, and wanting to do something halfway productive.

I’ve been reading a lot less since starting my masters degree, because I’ve, y’know, got other things on. Also, I don’t take the train anywhere near as often. Look, there are excuses to be made and I’m making ’em. The upshot? I read four books last month, which puts me comfortably on track for reading fifty in the year.

labyrinth-lost-final-coverLABYRINTH LOST by Zoraida Córdova – Alex is the strongest bruja in her generation, but she hates magic and blames it for everything going wrong in her life. Unfortunately, magic this strong won’t be denied, and when she tries she ends up disappearing her whole noisy, complicated, loving family. This YA fantasy has a lot of elements I appreciate deeply: the whole cast is Latinx, and the main character is bisexual. There’s an interracial f/f romance where neither character is white! The system of magic and mythology are all intriguing and inspired by the author’s own culture. This is witchcraft as you might not have encountered it before. I loved the matriarchal vibes of Alex’s community: not having female siblings myself, I’m always fascinated by fictional sisters, and apparently the second book in the series is going to be about the eldest sister Lula, which is exciting. Overall, LABYRINTH LOST is a solid first instalment with a great premise, though I hope we get some fleshing out of Alex and Rishi’s relationship – or even just of Rishi, to be honest – in the next book.

0308_WATERSTONES_Butchers Hook_Bpb.inddTHE BUTCHER’S HOOK by Janet Ellis – Anne is a young women in Georgian society, and is therefore powerless. She is fated to marry the odious Onions, but she is in love – obsessive, consuming, bloody love – with Fub, the butcher’s boy. The novel is told through Anne’s voice throughout, and she is sharp and morbidly funny, an enjoyably twisted creation. The cleaving of flesh – sex, birth, death, butchery – is the theme here, and Anne’s sexual awakenings are intimately tied with her murderous ones. I don’t think it’s a spoiler to say she kills more than once. The first murder takes place in a truly extraordinary extended scene, narrated with such pitch black hilarity that I had to read lines out loud to the people around me at times. (I’m fun at parties.) I found the novel uneven as a whole; it isn’t quite virtuosic enough to pull off its dark trick of a protagonist, but it is enjoyable and entertaining, if very weird.

thepowerTHE POWER by Naomi Alderman – Teenage girls start to gain the power to create electricity – suddenly, they can hurt and even kill with ease. Naturally, all hell breaks loose. There is a lot of buzz, if you’ll permit the pun, around this book. Around December, everyone on my Twitter feed was recommending it. I finally decided to listen to it on Audible, having had that specifically recommended at least twice, too. I’m still having mixed feelings about it; it’s very smart, often exciting and tense, but I think suffers from its characters mostly being conduits for ideas rather than feeling like people. And yet, as I walked along listening, there were certain characters I would tell (out loud) to eff off. I remember listening to a particularly agonising scene on my walk to school on a Monday, and feeling devastated. I wanted to talk about this book all the time. I would give my very patient girlfriend summaries of what happened today, and how worried I was for so-and-so, and how insightful this analogy was. THE POWER is brilliant. I am sure I will be thinking about it for a very long time. You should read it and talk to me about it, though I’m sure the conversation will be mostly nodding enthusiastically and being amazed at how clever the author is.

23513349MILK AND HONEY by Rupi Kaur – Raw but tender collection of poetry about pain, love, and survival. Honestly, I think most of the really good poems in here were ones I’d seen before on tumblr – the author is a bit of an internet celebrity – but I enjoyed the collection. I can see why it has resonated with so many readers. There is authenticity and honesty in the poet’s voice, with every piece so deeply personal that it is able to communicate directly with the reader. I probably would have enjoyed it more if I hadn’t read the collection in one sitting, as the style gets a bit monotonous after a while. Poetry is memorable speech, according to Auden, and there is some truly memorable speech to be found here, especially in the poems about identity and body image.

Advertisements

1 thought on “What I Read in January”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s